We Saw a Vision

A hush fell over the Pilgrims as they entered the Garden of Remembrance.  A solemn but beautiful place, it was one of quiet reflection.  Her eye was immediately drawn to the large sculpture at the top of the stairs.  A nod to the Irish Legend, "The Children of Lir".   

   The pool guides your eye upward toward the sculpture.

 

The pool guides your eye upward toward the sculpture.

   "The Children of Lir" (Clann Lir / Leani Lir), who were the victims of their stepmother's jealously and as a result, were cursed to live as swans for 900 years.

 

"The Children of Lir" (Clann Lir / Leani Lir), who were the victims of their stepmother's jealously and as a result, were cursed to live as swans for 900 years.

The park is a memorial to all those who fought and died in the hopes of attaining Irish Freedom.  

   Inscribed on one of the walls is the poem "We Saw a Vision", written by Liam Mac Uistin in 1976.  This would not be the last time she wished she had learned Irish.

 

Inscribed on one of the walls is the poem "We Saw a Vision", written by Liam Mac Uistin in 1976.  This would not be the last time she wished she had learned Irish.

 

"In the darkness of despair we saw a vision,

We lit the light of hope and it was not extinguished.

In the desert of discouragement we saw a vision.

We planted the tree of valour and it blossomed.

In the winter of bondage we saw a vision

We melted the snow of lethargy and the river of resurrection flowed from it.

We sent our vision aswim like a swan on the river.  The vision became a reality.

Winter became summer.  Bondage became freedom and this we left to you as your inheritance.

O generations of freedom remember us, the generations of the vision."

"You can never be overdressed or overeducated."

My introduction to Oscar Wilde was in the form of two animated short films - "The Selfish Giant" and "The Happy Prince".  Growing up in rural Alberta, we only had three tv channels and one of them was French, which is why I am astounded that I had the opportunity to see them at all.  I can't recall when exactly, but I do know that I watched them every year around the same time.  Something tells me it was during the holiday season, but I could be mistaken.

At any rate, both films entranced me.  Although I could recite the narration by heart, I was still brought to tears every single time.  

Later, I saw an adaptation of "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and once again found myself drawn in.  What is it about Oscar Wilde's work that has not only survived, but continued to thrive over 100 years later?  What is it about the man that intrigues and delights us so?

The famous Oscar Wilde Statue in Merrion Square, Dublin.  


The famous Oscar Wilde Statue in Merrion Square, Dublin.  

No literary tour of Dublin would be considered complete without including Oscar Wilde.  I was giddy as a school girl (funny how he still has that effect on people, wouldn't he be thrilled?).  Not only did I see (and touch!) the statue, but I also stood in front of his residence, which is located directly across the street.

   Fangirl moment!  I don't typically enjoy having my photo taken but how could I not?  I would never forgive myself.

 

Fangirl moment!  I don't typically enjoy having my photo taken but how could I not?  I would never forgive myself.

I also had the opportunity to visit Trinity College, Dublin - where Oscar Wilde (among others) studied.  I'll tell you all about it later.  In the meantime, thanks to YouTube, you can watch "The Selfish Giant" here:  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jtLTS7T8cc

and "The Happy Prince" here: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Aank8bDtcE

Irish Book Haul !

I wouldn't be much of a writer if I didn't bring home a book or two from my Bardic Journey, would I?

I was completely captivated with "The Eve of St Agnes", a breathtaking stained glass masterpiece on display at Hugh Lane Gallery in Dublin.  Created by Irish artist, Harry Clarke, it was inspired by the John Keats poem of the same name and commissioned by Mr Harold Jacob for his father's home.  

I stood before the display for some time and (because the photos I took didn't nearly do it justice) was delighted to find this book in their gift shop.  You can learn more about it here :
http://www.hughlane.ie/eve-of-st-agnes-by-harry-clarke2

I had the opportunity to spend an afternoon shopping in Sligo and absolutely loved it there!  I was told to be on the lookout for this book, so naturally I scooped up a copy as soon as I saw it.  

I also found this!  If you take the time to chat with any of the residents of Sligo, they will tell you about the myths and legends centered around the area.  The Goddess is very much alive there and is kept alive, thanks to those who share these stories!  

I bought both books from Libre, a fabulous shop!  http://liber.ie/

Last, but most certainly not least...

I had the pleasure of meeting Lora O'Brien, who guided us on a tour of Rathcroghan.  We started at Rathcroghan Mound, where Medb, Queen of Connacht is said to have lived.  Then we ventured to The Morrigan's Cave (a journey not for the faint of heart I can assure you).  Both of which I will tell you more about another time.  For now, I will say that Lora is an excellent resource not only regarding the land, but the mythology associated with it.  I hope to one day buy her a pint so that we can chat about it in greater detail.  I am certain she has many great stories to tell!

I purchased my copy from Lora directly, but you can find her books (as well as her blog) on her website.  http://www.loraobrien.com/

I very much look forward to diving into these and will certainly write up a review for each once I've had a chance to do so.  Meanwhile, stay tuned for more posts and pics from my Bardic Journey to Ireland!