Photo by ferar/iStock / Getty Images

Photo by ferar/iStock / Getty Images

"Almost every writer you will ever meet will talk about the fabled 'antique oak desk' that they were convinced was the key to their success.  The truth is that you don't need the desk.  What you need is a great story, the commitment to get it out of your head, and the desire to stick with it even when the novelty of being a writer has long worn off."

- KS Thompson   

 

  At Glencar Waterfall, Ireland - 2016

At Glencar Waterfall, Ireland - 2016

KS Thompson worked as a radio copywriter for almost two decades.  In that time, she created thousands of successful ad campaigns for a wide variety of clients.

A series of PSA's that she conceptualized were finalists in the 2017 Crystals Radio Awards.  This award highlights the best in Canadian Radio Creative from across the country, from small market stations to large-scale ad agencies.

Her own work consists of original Faerie Tales, based on mythology and folklore.  The Faeries in her stories are not all goodness and light.  Not by a long shot.  The darker aspects and more sinister tones play a huge role in both the characters she introduces us to and the stories they help her tell.

She has been heavily influenced by classic works from Hans Christian Andersen, the Brothers Grimm, and Aesop as well as the artwork of Arthur Rackham, Brian Froud, and Alan Lee.


While taking a walk through the woods one rather gloomy spring day, she caught a glimpse of a young girl with short dark hair and dark eyes.  There was something strange yet not sinister about her.  She seemed familiar, somehow.  The writer continued on, searching through breaks in the trees until, much to her surprise, she found herself face to face with the strange girl.  They regarded each other for a moment, then the girl’s eyes narrowed and grew darker still.

We’re waiting.

The words were heard not with her ears but with her heart, for the girl’s lips remained still.  She wasn’t especially frightened, not by the girl anyway.  What scared her was the thought that the stories she loved so much may never be known to anyone else but her.